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Assistants of President of Azerbaijan Find Another Enemy of Nation

Assistants of President of Azerbaijan Find Another Enemy of Nation
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2017 December 21 ( Thursday )  11:37:49
Print version
Русский Azərbaycan

Baku / 21.12.17 / Turan: Two assistants to the President of Azerbaijan, Ali Hasanov and Novruz Mammadov, with diligence worthy of a better application, rushed to expose another "enemy" of Azerbaijan in the face of the British newspaper Financial Times.

Not having learned for many years to come up with a new version, Ali Hasanov and Novruz Mammadov say the article entitled The Council of Europe Renounces Human Rights? serves "the dirty interests of certain external anti-Azerbaijani circles."

Ali Hasanov is genuinely indignant about how they accuse the Azerbaijani authorities of violating the rights of citizens when Azerbaijan is known in the world as a country "developing along the road of democracy, having a strong economy and a high international authority, and ensuring all freedoms."

At the same time, he refers to the study "conducted by the order of the EU Eastern Partnership program by the Dutch humanitarian partner organization ACT LLC. (It's strange that Ali Hasanov suddenly began to respect the EU countries and the Eastern Partnership program, which he publicly scolded very severely).

Not inventing anything smarter, Hasanov accused the Armenian lobby of "trying to tarnish Azerbaijan's image", and the Financial Times newspaper of "becoming a tool in the hands of these circles."

As for Novruz Mammadov, he was able to "excel" by inventing something new, calling the Financial Times "an insidious and biased actor of international relations."

What this means, probably, only the students of Nakhchivan schools, where Mammadov once taught, could explain.

Unsatisfied with what has been achieved, Mammadov makes another geopolitical discovery and calls the Financial Times "responsible for the tensions in the international arena that have arisen today."

Further Mammadov slides down to the kitchen gossip level, which is already indecent to comment on. -02D-